Family pt2

I have mentioned before how my mother went to university, but it is an overstatement to say that her accomplishing that was easy or normal in her family; she was the very first one to attend this higher level of education and actually finish it; and she did so with nearly perfect scores, coming in third place from her entire school of thousands of students. Getting her degree was intense, though: the 1980s were not good years to earn a degree in Cuba. The year in which my mother graduated high school and started applying for university, Cuba was in need of teachers all over the country. My mother was very excited about university and having put medicine—specifically a neurologist—as her first choice in what she wanted to study in made her proud. But the Cuban government had other plans, so she was forced into studying to become an English teacher the next four years of her life. Her biggest support during this difficult time was her grandmother, who had always supported her in anything she accomplished, and who told Irisbel that if she didn’t finish her major despite her hatred towards it, she would never finish anything else in her life because, as she used to say: “all that is started must be finished if you seek success in your life.”
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Family

At an early age (only 2 years old), Irisbel Ortiz Rivero started showing her clear, prominent trait of persistence. It was a fiery summer day in Cuba, and Iris had just arrived from a long car ride that had taken her from Camagüey to La Havana. The entire trip—which had been a long 5 hours in the least—riled up Irisbel’s growing desire to visit Coppelia, a place which was known throughout the country for its amazing ice cream. Since many people liked to have something to refresh themselves with under the hot and unforgiving sun, no one really questioned people who traveled several states just to get a taste of the Cuban delicacy that was Coppelia.
Continue reading “Family”

When I need you

It was December 23, 2003 when I came,

and, then, only ten days after, you left,

And from that time I should’ve known

That it would always stay the same.

Years came and we got closer

But then you got another family.

I always knew you were a poser

But it still hurt to see you happily.

Fifteen years have gone by

And I can’t help but realize:

You’d never sing me a lullaby

And yet I loved you without thinking twice.

When I think of it, with me

I sympathize

Because that love I thought you for me had

Feels like nothing but a lie.

Years came and we got closer

And you’d still claim a lot from me,

And even though you never call me

I still became your devotee.

We went different ways,

But I still loved you;

We become different people,

But I still missed you.

Life brought us back together

And I thought it would be for good

But everything stayed like always

(Probably the way it always should).

And then my fifteenth party arrived

And you made it your second option.

That day I realized you’re never there.

You’re never there when I need you.

Music Turned Into Writing: I don’t want to be you anymore

I’ve always wanted to be the star of the show. It might sound narcissistic but, honestly, being the main focus of everything always felt really good and right—like it was meant to be for me. Growing up I had everything to make it possible for me to stand out: the personality, the charisma, what my teachers called the ‘spark’, the talents, the easygoing nature, etc. So, it was never hard for me to fit in anywhere and always have massive crowds of people after or with me at all times. Continue reading “Music Turned Into Writing: I don’t want to be you anymore”

The sea

When I think about how my life used to be when I was a child, the first thing that comes to mind is that sacred place in which I spent most of my earliest days alive: the sea. The thrilling and yet peace-inducing waves that would carry my body from side to side seem to be one of the sea’s features that I reminisce whenever I’m near said place. Continue reading “The sea”

A Series Of Fortunate Vignettes

Vignette: a small impressionistic scene, an illustration, a descriptive passage, a short essay, a fiction or nonfiction work focusing on one particular moment; or giving an impression about an idea, character, setting, mood, aspect, or object.

Being fourteen is more than just going through one more of the “angsty and rebellious” years of your life. Being fourteen means Continue reading “A Series Of Fortunate Vignettes”

“A Death Ends a Life, Not a Relationship”

From left to right: My great grandmother, me (at three years old), and my mother.

“A death ends a life, not a relationship.” This was said by Morrie, the main character of the book ‘Tuesdays with Morrie’. I can relate incredibly to this quote because I experienced the death of someone extremely close to me when I was a child. At only four and a half years old, Continue reading ““A Death Ends a Life, Not a Relationship””

31 Day Blog Challenge—Day 3

For today, I was supposed to talk about the meaning behind my blog’s name, but although I thought about writing it, I hesitated given I would most likely end up with several pages consisting of the reasons why I named it Modern Day Lilith. So, I decided to wait until later on in my blogger life to explain the reason why I chose the intriguing and possibly controversial alias.

Given the circumstances stated, I’m going to talk about my earliest childhood memory instead. Continue reading “31 Day Blog Challenge—Day 3”